More Boxes!

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Tea-Bowls 20 – 23

I really enjoy the variety of this group. I formed #20 with legs from a single slab of clay (a nice change of approach and a good challenge on keeping it loose) #21 is an actual tumbler with a rounded bottom (webble-wobble and all) #22 is really tight, clean, and symmetrical and #23 is the largest I’ve stretched the size of the tea-bowl with a soft bulge of silhouette and hint of a lip. Having this much variety in such a small group of tea-bowls makes me anxious to see how far I can push the form for the remaining 77!  For those curious, the white powder you see on the forms is actually cornstarch; I use it as a barrier so the clay doesn’t stick to surfaces when i’m hand building.

Float Blue Glaze

Float Blue glaze has been the most popular of the glazes I’ve used. I find the variety of vibrant colors within the glaze quite interesting. As you’ll see in all of the pieces in this post, something as simple as a little texture or whether it’s geometric or more angular changes the way the color manifests.

I was unable to find much in the way of history on this glaze which makes me think it’s one that’s been developed within the last century if not the last 50-30 years.

Jun Ware

Jun Ware also has a deep rich history, originating in China in the first century. It typically shows as a brilliant sky blue and a bit thicker than most glazes which allows for some really interesting possibilities for controlled (or uncontrolled) drips. If you’d like to read more on Jun Ware, you can find great resources here: http://gotheborg.com/glossary/jun.shtml and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jun_ware

Ironstone Box

Today is the day! If you are in Columbus, Ohio, I hope to see you at the Winter Flea at Strongwater, 400 West Rich Street, 43215, 12 – 5 pm.

1″ box finished with the Ironstone glaze on the outside and Sumiko’s white on the inside.

This is my new favorite! I find I gravitate to the smaller pieces with lovely understated flourishes.

Production Mode

Sometimes it’s helpful when trying to comprehend the amount of work going into forming these vessels for one to see the “underbelly” of the production beast.

Love-Bird Boxes

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The glaze found and settled in the crevasses of the texture on these love-bird boxes, hooray! There’s something really lovely about the surprise of ceramics, no matter how much you plan there is an addition of chance that can create happenings that can never be duplicated. I’ll be sure to try this textural approach on more pieces with different glazes as well.

I think these two boxes embody one of my very favorite quotes: “Consider everything an experiment.” -Sister Corita Kent